École Normale de Musique de Paris  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
See also École Normale Supérieure.

The École Normale de Musique de Paris was founded in 1919 by the pianist Alfred Cortot and his partner Auguste Mangeot. From the very beginning, the institution enjoyed a world-wide reputation for the quality of its music teaching with such faculty members as Pierre Bernac, Pablo Casals, Nadia Boulanger, Wanda Landowska, Paul Dukas and Arthur Honegger.

The school is officially approved by the State Ministry of Culture and Communication. It also formed a number of well-known concertists and composers. Dinu Lipatti, Samson François and Igor Markevitch among many other celebrities studied in the Belle Époque architectural environment of this Parisian temple of classical music.

Today, the institution is managed by Henri Heugel and a "Conseil d'Orientation Musicale" composed of Paul Badura-Skoda, Narcis Bonet, Elliott Carter, Jean Michel Damase, Jean Louis Mansart, Christian Ivaldi and Kent Nagano. The school gathers 1200 students and 120 faculty members who teach all disciplines of classical music including theoretical classes, orchestra conducting and composition. The school is located in the heart of Paris and registered as a "Historical landmark" by the French Administration. Its concert hall, the Salle Cortot, is an "Art Deco" masterpiece designed by the architect Auguste Perret, who also realised the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris.

Prominent Faculty




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