1820s  

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View from the Window at Le Gras is one of Nicéphore Niépce's earliest surviving photographs, circa 1826.
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View from the Window at Le Gras is one of Nicéphore Niépce's earliest surviving photographs, circa 1826.
Stendhal's depiction of the process of falling in love, from On Love, 1822
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Stendhal's depiction of the process of falling in love, from On Love, 1822

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The 1820s decade ran from January 1, 1820, to December 31, 1829. The 1820s witnesses the birth of Romanticism with Victor Hugo's preface Cromwell and the paintings of Delacroix. The 1820s sees also the birth of photography.

Contents

Popular culture

Events and trends include the first music halls in the UK and the first photograph by Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.

  • The use of the word "blue" to refer to risqué content was first recorded in Scotland in 1824.

Music

Literature

Newly published

Visual art

Births


Technology

  • World's first modern railway, the Stockton and Darlington Railway, opens to the public in 1825.
  • Invention of the photograph and the first still existing photograph taken in 1826.
  • Karl Ernst von Baer discovers the human ovum

Politics and wars

Wars

Internal conflicts

Colonization

Decolonization and independence

  • Nationalistic independence helped reshape the world during this decade:
  • Mexico gains Independence from Spain after a bitter bloody war, leaving most of Mexico in ruins (1821)

Prominent political events

Economics





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "1820s" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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