Citizenship  

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-'''Ideal city''' refers to a [[City planning|plan]] for a city that has been conceived in accordance with the dictates of some "rational" or "moral" objective.  
-==Concept==+'''Citizenship''' is the state of being a citizen of a particular social, political, or national community.
-The "ideal" nature of such a city may encompass the [[moral]], [[Spirituality|spiritual]] and [[juridical]] qualities of [[citizenship]] as well as the ways in which these are realised through urban structures including buildings, street layout, etc. The ground plans of ideal cities are often based on grids (in imitation of [[Ancient Rome|Roman]] town planning) or other geometrical patterns. The ideal city is often an attempt to deploy [[Utopian]] ideals at the local level of urban configuration and living space and amenity rather than at the culture- or civilisation-wide level of the classical Utopias such as [[St Thomas More]]'s.+Citizenship status, under [[social contract theory]], carries with it both rights and responsibilities. "[[Active citizenship]]" is the philosophy that citizens should work towards the betterment of their [[community]] through economic participation, public service, [[volunteer]] work, and other such efforts to improve life for all citizens. In this vein, [[school]]s in some countries provide [[citizenship education]].
- +==See also==
-==History==+
- +
-Several attempts to develop ideal city plans are known from the [[Renaissance]], and appear from the second half of the fifteenth century. The concept dates at least from the period of [[Plato]], whose ''[[The Republic (Plato)|Republic]]'' is a philosophical exploration of the notion of the 'ideal city'. The nobility of the Renaissance, seeking to imitate the qualities of [[Classical antiquity|Classical civilisation]], sometimes sought to construct such ideal cities either in reality or notionally through a reformation of manners and culture.+
- +
-==Examples==+
- +
-Examples of the ideal cities include [[Filarete]]'s "Sforzinda", a description of which was included in his ''Trattato di Architettura'' (c. 1465). The city of Sforzinda was laid out within an eight-pointed star inscribed within a circular [[moat]]. Further examples may have been intended to have been read into the so-called "Urbino" and "Baltimore" panels (second half of the fifteenth century), which show [[Classical architecture|Classically]] influenced architecture disposed in logically planned [[piazza]]s. Late nineteenth-century examples of the ideal city include the [[Garden city movement]] of Sir [[Ebenezer Howard]], realised at [[Letchworth Garden City]] and [[Welwyn Garden City]] in England. [[Poundbury]], [[Prince Charles]]' architectural vision established in [[Dorset]], is among the most recent examples of ideal city planning.+
 +* [[Citizenship in the United States]]
 +* [[Global citizenship]]
 +* [[History of citizenship]]
 +* [[Transnational citizenship]]
 +* [[Honorary citizenship]]
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Citizenship is the state of being a citizen of a particular social, political, or national community.

Citizenship status, under social contract theory, carries with it both rights and responsibilities. "Active citizenship" is the philosophy that citizens should work towards the betterment of their community through economic participation, public service, volunteer work, and other such efforts to improve life for all citizens. In this vein, schools in some countries provide citizenship education.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Citizenship" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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