Content analysis  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 22:45, 14 August 2008
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)
(Textual analysis moved to Content analysis)
← Previous diff
Current revision
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-'''Content analysis''' (sometimes called '''textual analysis''') is a standard [[methodology]] in the [[social sciences]] for studying the [[content]] of [[communication]]. [[Earl Babbie]] defines it as "the study of recorded human communications, such as [[book]]s, [[website]]s, [[painting]]s and [[law]]s."+'''Content analysis''' (sometimes called '''textual analysis''') is a standard [[methodology]] in the [[social sciences]] for studying the [[Content (media)|content]] of [[communication]]. [[Earl Babbie]] defines it as "the study of recorded human communications, such as [[book]]s, [[website]]s, [[painting]]s and [[law]]s."
However, it is also a [[scholarly]] methodology in the [[humanities]] by which [[texts]] are studied as to [[authorship]], [[authenticity]], or [[meaning]]. This latter subject include [[philology]], [[hermeneutics]], and [[semiotics]]. However, it is also a [[scholarly]] methodology in the [[humanities]] by which [[texts]] are studied as to [[authorship]], [[authenticity]], or [[meaning]]. This latter subject include [[philology]], [[hermeneutics]], and [[semiotics]].
[[Harold Lasswell]] formulated the core questions of content analysis: "Who says what, to whom, why, to what extent and with what effect?." [[Ole Holsti]] (1969) offers a broad definition of content analysis as "any technique for making inferences by objectively and systematically identifying specified characteristics of messages." [[Harold Lasswell]] formulated the core questions of content analysis: "Who says what, to whom, why, to what extent and with what effect?." [[Ole Holsti]] (1969) offers a broad definition of content analysis as "any technique for making inferences by objectively and systematically identifying specified characteristics of messages."
 +==See also==
 +* [[Hermeneutics]]
 +* [[Donald Wayne Foster]]
 +* [[Transition words ]]
 +
{{GFDL}} {{GFDL}}

Current revision

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

Content analysis (sometimes called textual analysis) is a standard methodology in the social sciences for studying the content of communication. Earl Babbie defines it as "the study of recorded human communications, such as books, websites, paintings and laws."

However, it is also a scholarly methodology in the humanities by which texts are studied as to authorship, authenticity, or meaning. This latter subject include philology, hermeneutics, and semiotics.

Harold Lasswell formulated the core questions of content analysis: "Who says what, to whom, why, to what extent and with what effect?." Ole Holsti (1969) offers a broad definition of content analysis as "any technique for making inferences by objectively and systematically identifying specified characteristics of messages."

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Content analysis" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools