Doctor Faustus (play)  

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-In [[Christopher Marlowe]]'s ''[[Doctor Faustus (play)|Doctor Faustus]]'' (1604), [[Faust]] [[Evocation|conjures]] the [[Shade (mythology)|shade]] of Helen. Upon seeing Helen, Faustus speaks the famous line: "Was this the face that launch'd a thousand ships, / And burnt the topless towers of Ilium." (Act V, Scene I.) Helen is also conjured by Faust in [[Goethe's Faust|Goethe's ''Faust'']].+'''''The Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus''''', commonly referred to simply as '''''Doctor Faustus''''', is a play by [[Christopher Marlowe]], based on the ''[[Faust]]'' story, in which a man sells his soul to the devil for power and knowledge. ''Doctor Faustus'' was first published in 1604, eleven years after Marlowe's death and at least twelve years after the first performance of the play.
-In [[Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood|Pre-Raphaelite]] art, Helen is often shown with shining curly hair and ringlets. Other painters of the same period depict Helen on the ramparts of Troy, and focus on her expression: her face is expressionless, blank, inscrutable. In [[Gustave Moreau]]'s painting, Helen will finally become faceless; a blank ''eidonon'' in the middle of Troy's ruins.+"No Elizabethan play outside the Shakespeare canon has raised more controversy than ''Doctor Faustus''. There is no agreement concerning the nature of the text and the date of composition... and the centrality of the ''Faust'' legend in the history of the Western world precludes any definitive agreement on the interpretation of the play..."<ref>Logan and Smith, p. 14.</ref>
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 +==See also==
 +*[[Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris]], line from the play, commonly translated as "misery loves company"
 +*[[Faust]]
 +*[[Deal with the Devil]]
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

The Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus, commonly referred to simply as Doctor Faustus, is a play by Christopher Marlowe, based on the Faust story, in which a man sells his soul to the devil for power and knowledge. Doctor Faustus was first published in 1604, eleven years after Marlowe's death and at least twelve years after the first performance of the play.

"No Elizabethan play outside the Shakespeare canon has raised more controversy than Doctor Faustus. There is no agreement concerning the nature of the text and the date of composition... and the centrality of the Faust legend in the history of the Western world precludes any definitive agreement on the interpretation of the play..."<ref>Logan and Smith, p. 14.</ref>


See also




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