Doo-wop  

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 +'''Doo-wop''' is a style of [[rhythm and blues]] that was developed in [[African-American]] communities in [[New York]], [[Philadelphia]], [[Chicago]], [[Baltimore]], [[Newark, New Jersey|Newark]], [[Pittsburgh]], [[Cincinnati]], [[Detroit]], [[Washington D.C]] and [[Los Angeles]] in the 1940s, achieving mainstream popularity in the 1950s and early '60s. Built upon [[vocal harmony]], doo-wop was one of the most mainstream, pop-oriented R&B styles of the time. Singer [[Bill Kenny (singer)|Bill Kenny]] (1914–1978) is often called the "Godfather of Doo-wop" for his "top and bottom" format featuring a high tenor lead and "talking bass" in the middle of the song.
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 +Doo-wop features vocal group [[harmony]], nonsense syllables, a simple beat, sometimes little or no [[instrumentation]], and simple music and [[lyrics]].
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 +== See also ==
 +* [[List of doo-wop musicians]]
 +* [[Scat singing]]
 +* [[Vocalese]]
 +* [[50s progression]]
 +* [[Boogie]]
 +
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Doo-wop is a style of rhythm and blues that was developed in African-American communities in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Baltimore, Newark, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Detroit, Washington D.C and Los Angeles in the 1940s, achieving mainstream popularity in the 1950s and early '60s. Built upon vocal harmony, doo-wop was one of the most mainstream, pop-oriented R&B styles of the time. Singer Bill Kenny (1914–1978) is often called the "Godfather of Doo-wop" for his "top and bottom" format featuring a high tenor lead and "talking bass" in the middle of the song.

Doo-wop features vocal group harmony, nonsense syllables, a simple beat, sometimes little or no instrumentation, and simple music and lyrics.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Doo-wop" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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