Dual process theory  

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-'''Belief bias''' is the tendency to judge the strength of [[argument]]s based on the plausibility of their conclusion rather than how strongly they support that conclusion.+In [[psychology]], a '''dual process theory''' provides an account of how thought can arise in two different ways, or as a result of two different processes. Often, the two processes consist of an implicit (automatic), [[unconscious mind|unconscious]] process and an explicit (controlled), [[consciousness|conscious]] process. Verbalized explicit processes or attitudes and actions may change with persuasion or education; though implicit process or attitudes usually take a long amount of time to change with the forming of new habits. Dual process theories can be found in social, personality, cognitive, and clinical psychology. It has also been linked with economics via [[prospect theory]] and [[behavioral economics]], and increasingly in [[sociology]] through cultural analysis.
==See also== ==See also==
-* [[Confirmation bias]]+* [[Automatic and controlled processes (ACP)]]
-* [[Dual process theory]]+* [[Cognitive inhibition]]
-* [[Hostile media effect]]+* [[Dual process model of coping]]
-* [[List of cognitive biases]]+* [[Dual process theory (moral psychology)]]
 +* [[Opponent-process theory]]
 + 
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In psychology, a dual process theory provides an account of how thought can arise in two different ways, or as a result of two different processes. Often, the two processes consist of an implicit (automatic), unconscious process and an explicit (controlled), conscious process. Verbalized explicit processes or attitudes and actions may change with persuasion or education; though implicit process or attitudes usually take a long amount of time to change with the forming of new habits. Dual process theories can be found in social, personality, cognitive, and clinical psychology. It has also been linked with economics via prospect theory and behavioral economics, and increasingly in sociology through cultural analysis.

See also





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