Freedom of the press  

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With respect to governmental information, a government distinguishes which materials are public or protected from disclosure to the public based on [[classified information|classification of information]] as sensitive, classified or secret and being otherwise protected from disclosure due to relevance of the information to protecting the [[national interest]]. Many governments are also subject to sunshine laws or [[freedom of information legislation]] that are used to define the ambit of national interest. With respect to governmental information, a government distinguishes which materials are public or protected from disclosure to the public based on [[classified information|classification of information]] as sensitive, classified or secret and being otherwise protected from disclosure due to relevance of the information to protecting the [[national interest]]. Many governments are also subject to sunshine laws or [[freedom of information legislation]] that are used to define the ambit of national interest.
 +==See also==
 +*''[[Areopagitica]]: a speech of Mr John Milton for the liberty of unlicensed printing to the [[Parliament of England]]''
 +*[[Censorship]]
 +*[[Chilling effect (term)]]
 +*[[Cohen v. Cowles Media Co.]] — a ruling in the USA that a reporter's promise of a source's confidentiality may be enforced in court.
 +*[[Declaration of Windhoek]] (1991)
 +*[[Editorial independence]]
 +*[[First Amendment to the United States Constitution]]
 +*[[Freedom of speech]]
 +*[[Gag order]]
 +*[[International Freedom of Expression Exchange]] — “The largest online archive of information on press freedom violations”, dating back to 1995 and covering more than 120 countries.
 +*[[Internet censorship]]
 +*[[Journalism]]
 +*[[Journalism ethics and standards]]
 +*[[Journaliste en danger]]
 +*[[Journalistic standards]]
 +*[[Libel]]
 +*[[List of indices of freedom]]
 +*[[Media blackout]]
 +*[[Media transparency]]
 +*[[News embargo]]
 +*[[Section Two of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms]]
 +*[[Muckraker]]
 +*[[Prior restraint]]
 +*[[State media]]
 +*[[Tunisia Monitoring Group]]
 +*[[World Press Freedom Day]] on May 3
 +*[[John Peter Zenger]]
 +
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
"Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one."

Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. It also extends to news gathering, and processes involved in obtaining information for public distribution. Not all countries are protected by a bill of rights or the constitutional provision pertaining to Freedom of the Press.

With respect to governmental information, a government distinguishes which materials are public or protected from disclosure to the public based on classification of information as sensitive, classified or secret and being otherwise protected from disclosure due to relevance of the information to protecting the national interest. Many governments are also subject to sunshine laws or freedom of information legislation that are used to define the ambit of national interest.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Freedom of the press" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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