Historiography  

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 +:''[[Pseudohistory]]''
'''Historiography''' studies the processes by which historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted. Broadly speaking, historiography examines the [[writing]] of [[history]] and the use of [[historical method]]s, drawing upon such elements such as authorship, sourcing, interpretation, style, bias, and audience. The word historiography can also refer to a body of historical work. As the tools of historical investigation have changed over time and space, the term itself bears multiple meanings and is not readily associated with a single all-encompassing definition. '''Historiography''' studies the processes by which historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted. Broadly speaking, historiography examines the [[writing]] of [[history]] and the use of [[historical method]]s, drawing upon such elements such as authorship, sourcing, interpretation, style, bias, and audience. The word historiography can also refer to a body of historical work. As the tools of historical investigation have changed over time and space, the term itself bears multiple meanings and is not readily associated with a single all-encompassing definition.
Historiography is often broken down topically, such as "Historiography of Islam" or "Historiography of China". There are many approaches or genres of history, such as [[oral history]] and [[social history]]. Beginning in the 19th century with the rise of academic historians a corpus of literature related to historiography has come into existence, with classic works such as [[E. H. Carr]]'s, ''[[What is History?]]'' (1961) and [[Hayden White]]'s ''[[Metahistory]]'' (1974). Historiography is often broken down topically, such as "Historiography of Islam" or "Historiography of China". There are many approaches or genres of history, such as [[oral history]] and [[social history]]. Beginning in the 19th century with the rise of academic historians a corpus of literature related to historiography has come into existence, with classic works such as [[E. H. Carr]]'s, ''[[What is History?]]'' (1961) and [[Hayden White]]'s ''[[Metahistory]]'' (1974).
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
Pseudohistory

Historiography studies the processes by which historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted. Broadly speaking, historiography examines the writing of history and the use of historical methods, drawing upon such elements such as authorship, sourcing, interpretation, style, bias, and audience. The word historiography can also refer to a body of historical work. As the tools of historical investigation have changed over time and space, the term itself bears multiple meanings and is not readily associated with a single all-encompassing definition.

Historiography is often broken down topically, such as "Historiography of Islam" or "Historiography of China". There are many approaches or genres of history, such as oral history and social history. Beginning in the 19th century with the rise of academic historians a corpus of literature related to historiography has come into existence, with classic works such as E. H. Carr's, What is History? (1961) and Hayden White's Metahistory (1974).



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