Incitement  

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-'''Disturbing the peace''' is a [[crime]] generally defined as the unsettling of proper order in a public space through one's actions.+:''[[disturbing the peace]]''
-This can include creating loud noise by fighting or challenging to fight, disturbing others by loud and unreasonable noise, or using offensive words likely to [[incite violence]].+A call to [[act]]; [[encouragement]] to act, often in an [[illegal]] fashion.
 + 
 +In [[English law|English]] [[criminal law]], '''incitement''' was an anticipatory [[common law]] offence and was the act of persuading, encouraging, instigating, pressuring, or threatening so as to cause another to commit a crime.
 + 
 +It was abolished on 1 October 2008 when Part 2 of the [[Serious Crime Act 2007]] came into force, replacing it with three new [[statute|statutory]] offences of [[encouraging or assisting crime]].
 +==See also==
 + 
 +*[[Fighting words]]
 +*[[Incitement to ethnic or racial hatred]]
 +*[[Solicitation]]
 +*[[True threat]]
-Disturbing the peace is typically considered a [[misdemeanor]] and is often punishable by either a fine or brief term in jail. 
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
disturbing the peace

A call to act; encouragement to act, often in an illegal fashion.

In English criminal law, incitement was an anticipatory common law offence and was the act of persuading, encouraging, instigating, pressuring, or threatening so as to cause another to commit a crime.

It was abolished on 1 October 2008 when Part 2 of the Serious Crime Act 2007 came into force, replacing it with three new statutory offences of encouraging or assisting crime.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Incitement" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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