Mind's eye  

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-:"The mind of man can ''imagine'' nothing which has not really existed." --[[Edgar Allan Poe]], 1840 +The phrase "'''mind's eye'''" refers to the human ability for [[visualization]], i.e., for the experiencing of visual [[mental image|mental imagery]]; in other words, one's ability to "[[sight|see]]" things with the [[mind]].
-'''Imagination''' is accepted as the innate ability and [[process]] to invent partial or complete personal realms within the mind from elements derived from sense perceptions of the shared world. The term is technically used in [[psychology]] for the process of reviving in the [[mind]] [[perception|percepts]] of objects formerly given in sense perception. Since this use of the term conflicts with that of ordinary [[language]], some psychologists have preferred to describe this process as "[[imaging]]" or "[[imagery]]" or to speak of it as "reproductive" as opposed to "productive" or "constructive" imagination. Imagined images are seen with the "[[mind's eye]]". +
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-One hypothesis for the evolution of human imagination is that it allowed [[consciousness|conscious]] beings to solve problems (and hence increase an individual's [[fitness (biology)|fitness]]) by use of mental [[simulation]].+
-== Namesakes ==+
-*''[[The Pornographic Imagination]]''+
-== See also ==+
-*[[Fantastique]]+
-*[[Fiction]]+
-*[[Imaginary]]+
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

The phrase "mind's eye" refers to the human ability for visualization, i.e., for the experiencing of visual mental imagery; in other words, one's ability to "see" things with the mind.



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