Nineteenth century Paris  

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 +[[Image:Eiffel tower transparent GIF.gif|thumb|left|200px|[[Eiffel Tower]] in [[Paris]], [[France]]]]
 +[[Image:Olympia (1863) by Édouard Manet.jpg|thumb|right|200px|''[[Olympia (Manet) |Olympia]]'' (detail) by [[Édouard Manet]] was a [[succès de scandale]] when it was first exhibited at the [[Paris Salon of 1865]]. Today, it is considered as the start of [[modern art]].]]
 +[[Image:Charles Baudelaire.jpg|thumb|right|200px|French art critic [[Charles Baudelaire]](1821 – 1867)]]
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-[[Walter Benjamin]] called [[Paris]] "[[Nineteenth century Paris|the capital of the 19th century]]". Indeed, Paris was the birthplace of [[modern art]] and from the 1860s to the 1940s it was also the art capital of the world.+[[Walter Benjamin]] called [[Paris]] "[[Nineteenth century Paris|the capital of the 19th century]]". Indeed, Paris was the birthplace of [[modern art]] and from the [[1860s]] ruled as cultural capital of the world until well into the [[20th century]].
The [[Industrial Revolution]], the [[French Second Empire]], and the ''[[Belle Époque]]'' brought [[19th century]] [[Paris]] the greatest development in its history. From the 1840s, rail transport allowed an unprecedented flow of migrants into Paris attracted by employment in the new industries in the suburbs. The city underwent a massive renovation under [[Napoleon III]] and his assistant [[Baron Haussmann|Haussmann]], who [[Haussmann's renovation of Paris|leveled entire districts]] of narrow-winding medieval streets to create the network of wide avenues and neo-classical façades of modern Paris. The [[Industrial Revolution]], the [[French Second Empire]], and the ''[[Belle Époque]]'' brought [[19th century]] [[Paris]] the greatest development in its history. From the 1840s, rail transport allowed an unprecedented flow of migrants into Paris attracted by employment in the new industries in the suburbs. The city underwent a massive renovation under [[Napoleon III]] and his assistant [[Baron Haussmann|Haussmann]], who [[Haussmann's renovation of Paris|leveled entire districts]] of narrow-winding medieval streets to create the network of wide avenues and neo-classical façades of modern Paris.
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Paris recovered rapidly from these events to host the famous [[Universal Exposition]]s of the late [[nineteenth century]]. The [[Eiffel Tower]] was built for the French Revolution centennial [[Exposition Universelle (1889)|1889 Universal Exposition]], as a "temporary" display of architectural engineering prowess but remained the world's tallest building until 1930, and is the city's best-known landmark. The first line of the [[Paris Métro]] opened for the [[Exposition Universelle (1900)|1900 Universal Exposition]] and was an attraction in itself for visitors from the world over. Paris's World's Fair years also consolidated its position in the tourist industry and as an attractive setting for international technology and trade shows. Paris recovered rapidly from these events to host the famous [[Universal Exposition]]s of the late [[nineteenth century]]. The [[Eiffel Tower]] was built for the French Revolution centennial [[Exposition Universelle (1889)|1889 Universal Exposition]], as a "temporary" display of architectural engineering prowess but remained the world's tallest building until 1930, and is the city's best-known landmark. The first line of the [[Paris Métro]] opened for the [[Exposition Universelle (1900)|1900 Universal Exposition]] and was an attraction in itself for visitors from the world over. Paris's World's Fair years also consolidated its position in the tourist industry and as an attractive setting for international technology and trade shows.
== See also == == See also ==
 +*[[Paris#19th_century]]
 +*[[Haussmann's renovation of Paris]]
*[[Arcades Project]] *[[Arcades Project]]
*[[History of subcultures in the 19th century]] *[[History of subcultures in the 19th century]]
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*[[Artistic Montparnasse|Montparnasse]] *[[Artistic Montparnasse|Montparnasse]]
*[[French art of the 19th century]] *[[French art of the 19th century]]
 +*[[French literature of the 19th century]]
*[[French culture]] *[[French culture]]
 +*[[Arcades Project|''The Arcades Project'' (1927 - 1940)]]
 +*''[[The Mysteries of Paris]]''
 +*[[France in the long nineteenth century]]
{{GFDL}} {{GFDL}}
[[Category:city]] [[Category:city]]

Current revision

Olympia (detail) by Édouard Manet was a succès de scandale when it was first exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1865. Today, it is considered as the start of modern art.
Enlarge
Olympia (detail) by Édouard Manet was a succès de scandale when it was first exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1865. Today, it is considered as the start of modern art.
French art critic Charles Baudelaire(1821 – 1867)
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French art critic Charles Baudelaire(1821 – 1867)

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Walter Benjamin called Paris "the capital of the 19th century". Indeed, Paris was the birthplace of modern art and from the 1860s ruled as cultural capital of the world until well into the 20th century.

The Industrial Revolution, the French Second Empire, and the Belle Époque brought 19th century Paris the greatest development in its history. From the 1840s, rail transport allowed an unprecedented flow of migrants into Paris attracted by employment in the new industries in the suburbs. The city underwent a massive renovation under Napoleon III and his assistant Haussmann, who leveled entire districts of narrow-winding medieval streets to create the network of wide avenues and neo-classical façades of modern Paris.

Cholera epidemics in 1832 and 1849 affected the population of Paris — the 1832 epidemic alone claimed 20,000 of the then population of 650,000. Paris also suffered greatly from the siege ending the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871), and the ensuing civil war Commune of Paris (1871) killed thousands and sent many of Paris's administrative centres (and city archives) up in flames.

Paris recovered rapidly from these events to host the famous Universal Expositions of the late nineteenth century. The Eiffel Tower was built for the French Revolution centennial 1889 Universal Exposition, as a "temporary" display of architectural engineering prowess but remained the world's tallest building until 1930, and is the city's best-known landmark. The first line of the Paris Métro opened for the 1900 Universal Exposition and was an attraction in itself for visitors from the world over. Paris's World's Fair years also consolidated its position in the tourist industry and as an attractive setting for international technology and trade shows.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Nineteenth century Paris" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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