Openness  

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-#redirect[[Openness]]''+{| class="toccolours" style="float: left; margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 2em; font-size: 85%; background:#c6dbf7; color:black; width:30em; max-width: 40%;" cellspacing="5"
 +| style="text-align: left;" |
 +# Which is not [[closed]]; [[accessible]]; as, an open gate.
 +#: ''Turn left after the second '''open''' door.''
 +#* '''1908,''' Kenneth Grahame, ''The Wind in the Willows'', Chapter 2
 +#*: ''The '''open''' road, the dusty highway...''
 +# Actively conducting or prepared to [[conduct]] [[business]].
 +#: ''Banks are not '''open''' on bank holidays.''
 +# [[receptive|Receptive]].
 +#: ''I am '''open''' to new ideas.''
 +# [[public|Public]]; as, an open letter, an open declaration.
 +#: ''He published an '''open''' letter to the govenor on a full page of the New York Times.''
 +# [[candid|Candid]], [[ingenuous]], not [[subtle]] in [[character]]:
 +#: ''The man is an '''open''' book.''
 +|}
 +[[Image:The Big Swallow.jpg|thumb|right|200px|Extreme [[close-up]] from the movie "[[The Big Swallow]]" ([[1901]]), produced and directed by [[James Williamson]] (1855-1933)]]
 +[[Image:Eruption of Vesuvius (Turner).jpg|thumb|right|200px|''[[Eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79|Eruption of Vesuvius]]'' ([[1817]]) by [[William Turner]], an eruption of [[Vesuvius]]]]
 +{{Template}}
 +'''Openness''' may refer to a general [[philosophical position]] highlighted by a decision-making process recognizing [[community|communal]] management by distributed stakeholders (users, producers, or contributors) rather than a centralized authority (owners, experts, boards of directors, etc.).
 + 
 +[[Openness to experience|Openness]] (or intellect) is the name of one of the major dimensions of personality.
 + 
 + 
 +==References==
 + 
 +[[Umberto Eco]], 1989. [[The Open Work]]. Harvard UP.
 + 
 +==See also==
 +* [[Accessibility]]
 +* [[Freedom_of_association|Free association]]
 +* [[Free content]]
 +* [[Free software]]
 +* [[Glasnost]]
 +* [[Open source]]
 +* [[Open access]]: publishing
 +* [[Open innovation]]
 +* [[Open education]]
 +* [[Open educational resources]]
 +* [[Open-design movement]]
 +* [[Open government]]
 +* [[Open Knowledge Foundation]]
 +* [[Open knowledge]]
 +* [[Open-mindedness]]
 +* [[Open text]]
 +* [[Open gaming]]
 +* [[Open government]]
 +* [[Open patent]]
 +* [[Open-source curriculum]]
 +* [[Open-source governance]]
 +* [[Open-source hardware]]
 +* [[Open-source journalism]]
 +* [[Open-source model]]
 +* [[Open standard]]
 +* [[Openness to experience]]
 +* [[Secrecy]]: the opposite of openness
 +* [[The Open Definition]]
 +* [[Transparency (behavior)|Transparency]]: openness in a utilitarian view, economic openness, open economic or politic data, degree of openness, etc.
 + 
 +{{GFDL}}

Revision as of 10:48, 3 February 2019

  1. Which is not closed; accessible; as, an open gate.
    Turn left after the second open door.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows, Chapter 2
      The open road, the dusty highway...
  2. Actively conducting or prepared to conduct business.
    Banks are not open on bank holidays.
  3. Receptive.
    I am open to new ideas.
  4. Public; as, an open letter, an open declaration.
    He published an open letter to the govenor on a full page of the New York Times.
  5. Candid, ingenuous, not subtle in character:
    The man is an open book.
Extreme close-up from the movie "The Big Swallow" (1901), produced and directed by James Williamson (1855-1933)
Enlarge
Extreme close-up from the movie "The Big Swallow" (1901), produced and directed by James Williamson (1855-1933)

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Openness may refer to a general philosophical position highlighted by a decision-making process recognizing communal management by distributed stakeholders (users, producers, or contributors) rather than a centralized authority (owners, experts, boards of directors, etc.).

Openness (or intellect) is the name of one of the major dimensions of personality.


References

Umberto Eco, 1989. The Open Work. Harvard UP.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Openness" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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