Pre-Columbian era  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 07:18, 11 October 2008
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Revision as of 07:21, 11 October 2008
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

Next diff →
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-:'''Frederick W. Davis''' (ca. 1880-1961), operated an [[antiquities]] and [[folk art]] shop in [[Mexico City]]. Davis was an early collector and dealer in [[pre-Columbian]] and [[Mexican folk art]] and his shop was a place where Mexican Modern artists who were interested in pre-Columbian and folk art, often met. +The '''pre-Columbian''' era incorporates all [[archaeology of the Americas|period subdivisions]] in the [[history of the Americas|history and prehistory of the Americas]] before the appearance of significant [[Europe]]an influences on [[the Americas|the American]] continents. While technically referring to the era before [[Christopher Columbus]], in practice the term usually includes the history of [[indigenous peoples of the Americas|American indigenous cultures]] until they were conquered or significantly influenced by Europeans, even if this happened decades or even centuries after Columbus' initial landing.
 + 
 +Pre-Columbian is used especially often in the context of the great [[List of pre-Columbian civilizations|indigenous civilizations of the Americas]], such as those of [[Mesoamerica]] (the [[Olmec]], the [[Toltec]], the [[Teotihuacano]], the [[Zapotec civilization|Zapotec]], the [[Mixtec civilization|Mixtec]], the [[Aztec]] and the [[Maya civilization|Maya]]) and the [[Andes]] ([[Tahuantinsuyu|Inca]], [[Moche]], [[Chibcha]], [[Cañaris]]).
 + 
 +Many pre-Columbian [[civilization]]s established characteristics and hallmarks which included permanent or urban settlements, [[agriculture]], civic and monumental architecture, and [[complex society|complex societal hierarchies]]. Some of these civilizations had long faded by the time of the first permanent European arrivals (c. late 15th - early 16th centuries), and are known only through [[archaeology|archaeological]] investigations. Others were contemporary with this period, and are also known from historical accounts of the time. A few, such as the Maya, had their own written records. However, most Europeans of the time largely viewed such texts as heretical, and much was destroyed in Christian pyres. Only a few hidden documents remain today, leaving modern historians with glimpses of ancient culture and knowledge.
 + 
 +According to both indigenous American and European accounts and documents, American civilizations at the time of European encounter possessed many impressive accomplishments. For instance, the [[Aztec]]s built one of the most impressive cities in the world, [[Tenochtitlan]], the ancient site of [[Mexico City]], with an estimated population of 200,000. American civilizations also displayed impressive accomplishments in astronomy and mathematics.
 + 
 +Where they persist, the societies and cultures which are descended from these civilizations may now be substantively different in form from that of the original. However, many of these peoples and their descendants still uphold various traditions and practices which relate back to these earlier times, even if combined with those that were more recently adopted.
{{GFDL}} {{GFDL}}

Revision as of 07:21, 11 October 2008

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents. While technically referring to the era before Christopher Columbus, in practice the term usually includes the history of American indigenous cultures until they were conquered or significantly influenced by Europeans, even if this happened decades or even centuries after Columbus' initial landing.

Pre-Columbian is used especially often in the context of the great indigenous civilizations of the Americas, such as those of Mesoamerica (the Olmec, the Toltec, the Teotihuacano, the Zapotec, the Mixtec, the Aztec and the Maya) and the Andes (Inca, Moche, Chibcha, Cañaris).

Many pre-Columbian civilizations established characteristics and hallmarks which included permanent or urban settlements, agriculture, civic and monumental architecture, and complex societal hierarchies. Some of these civilizations had long faded by the time of the first permanent European arrivals (c. late 15th - early 16th centuries), and are known only through archaeological investigations. Others were contemporary with this period, and are also known from historical accounts of the time. A few, such as the Maya, had their own written records. However, most Europeans of the time largely viewed such texts as heretical, and much was destroyed in Christian pyres. Only a few hidden documents remain today, leaving modern historians with glimpses of ancient culture and knowledge.

According to both indigenous American and European accounts and documents, American civilizations at the time of European encounter possessed many impressive accomplishments. For instance, the Aztecs built one of the most impressive cities in the world, Tenochtitlan, the ancient site of Mexico City, with an estimated population of 200,000. American civilizations also displayed impressive accomplishments in astronomy and mathematics.

Where they persist, the societies and cultures which are descended from these civilizations may now be substantively different in form from that of the original. However, many of these peoples and their descendants still uphold various traditions and practices which relate back to these earlier times, even if combined with those that were more recently adopted.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Pre-Columbian era" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools