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 +[[Image:Silk Road.jpg|thumb|200px|The [[Silk Road]], [[Silk Road transmission of art|transmitter]] of [[Western culture]]]]
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-American exploitation culture is well-known throughout the world, [[European exploitation]] culture less so. 
-The previous posts on [[Stewart Home]] and [[Richard Allen]] led me to [[Hank Janson]] [Google Gallery] and [[Reginald Heade]] [Google gallery], the latter two examples of 1950s British exploitation culture.+In [[geography]], '''regions''' are areas broadly divided by physical characteristics ([[physical geography]]), human-impact characteristics ([[human geography]]), and the interaction of humanity and the environment ([[environmental geography]]). Geographic regions and sub regions are mostly described by their imprecisely defined, and sometimes transitory boundaries, except in human geography, where [[Jurisdiction (area)|jurisdiction]] areas such as national borders are clearly defined in law.
-Exploitation by region+Apart from the [[Earth|global]] [[continent]]al regions, there are also [[hydrosphere|hydrospheric]] and [[atmosphere|atmospheric]] regions that cover the [[ocean]]s, and discrete [[climate]]s above the land and water masses of the planet. The land and water global regions are divided into subregions geographically bounded by large geological features that influence large-scale ecologies, such as [[plain]]s and features.
-American exploitation - British exploitation - European exploitation - French exploitation - German exploitation - Italian exploitation - Japanese exploitation+As a way of describing spatial areas, the concept of regions is important and widely used among the many branches of geography, each of which can describe areas in regional terms. For example, ecoregion is a term used in [[environmental geography]], cultural region in [[cultural geography]], bioregion in [[biogeography]], and so on. The field of geography that studies regions themselves is called [[regional geography]].
-My interest in regional pulp culture is what it tells about the region where it is produced. In search of [[national stereotype]]s by way of their exploitation culture; regional stereotypes deduced from regional [[fear]]s and [[desire]]s (horror and eroticism).+In the fields of [[physical geography]], [[ecology]], [[biogeography]], [[zoogeography]], and [[environmental geography]], regions tend to be based on natural features such as [[ecosystem]]s or [[biotope]]s, [[biome]]s, [[drainage basin]]s, [[natural region]]s, [[mountain range]]s, [[soil type]]s. Where [[human geography]] is concerned, the regions and subregions are described by the discipline of [[ethnography]].
-[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/{{PAGENAMEE}}] [May 2007]+A region has its own nature that could not be moved. The first nature is its natural environment (landform, climate, etc.). The second nature is its physical elements complex that were built by people in the past. The third nature is its socio-cultural context that could not be replaced by new immigrants.
 + 
 +== See also ==
 +*[[Culture by region]]
 + 
 +{{GFDL}}

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In geography, regions are areas broadly divided by physical characteristics (physical geography), human-impact characteristics (human geography), and the interaction of humanity and the environment (environmental geography). Geographic regions and sub regions are mostly described by their imprecisely defined, and sometimes transitory boundaries, except in human geography, where jurisdiction areas such as national borders are clearly defined in law.

Apart from the global continental regions, there are also hydrospheric and atmospheric regions that cover the oceans, and discrete climates above the land and water masses of the planet. The land and water global regions are divided into subregions geographically bounded by large geological features that influence large-scale ecologies, such as plains and features.

As a way of describing spatial areas, the concept of regions is important and widely used among the many branches of geography, each of which can describe areas in regional terms. For example, ecoregion is a term used in environmental geography, cultural region in cultural geography, bioregion in biogeography, and so on. The field of geography that studies regions themselves is called regional geography.

In the fields of physical geography, ecology, biogeography, zoogeography, and environmental geography, regions tend to be based on natural features such as ecosystems or biotopes, biomes, drainage basins, natural regions, mountain ranges, soil types. Where human geography is concerned, the regions and subregions are described by the discipline of ethnography.

A region has its own nature that could not be moved. The first nature is its natural environment (landform, climate, etc.). The second nature is its physical elements complex that were built by people in the past. The third nature is its socio-cultural context that could not be replaced by new immigrants.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Region" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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