Rogério Sganzerla  

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- +'''Rogério Sganzerla''' (4 May 1946 — 9 January 2004) was a Brazilian filmmaker. One of the main names of the ''[[cinema marginal]]'' [[Underground film|underground]] movement, his most known work is ''[[The Red Light Bandit]]'' (1968). Influenced by [[Orson Welles]], [[Jean-Luc Godard]], and [[José Mojica Marins]], Sganzerla often used clichés from [[film noir]] and [[pornochanchada]]s. Irony, narrative subversion and collage were trademarks of his film aesthetics.
-A "marginal cinema" emerges associated with the [[Mouth of Garbage Cinema|Boca de Lixo]] area in São Paulo. In 1968, [[Rogério Sganzerla]] releases ''O Bandido da Luz Vermelha'', a story based on an infamous criminal of the period. The following year Júlio Bressane's ''[[Killed the Family and Went to the Movies (1969 film)|Killed the Family and Went to the Movies]]'' (''Matou a família e foi ao cinema'') comes out, a story in which the protagonist does exactly what is described by the title. Marginal cinema of this period is sometimes also referred to as "udigrudi", a bastardization of the English word [[Underground culture|underground]]. Also popular was [[Zé do Caixão]], the screen alter ego of actor and horror film director [[José Mojica Marins]].+
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-Associated with the genre is also the [[pornochanchada]], a popular genre in the 1970s. As the name suggests, these were sex comedies, though they did not depict sex explicitly. One key factor as to why these marginal films thrived was that film theaters were obliged to obey quotas for national films. Many owners of such establishments would finance low budget films, including those of pornographic content. Though the country was under dictatorship, [[censorship]] tended to be more political than cultural. That these films thrived could be perceived by many as a cause of embarrassment, yet they managed to draw in enough audiences so as to stay on the market consistently throughout those years.+
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Rogério Sganzerla (4 May 1946 — 9 January 2004) was a Brazilian filmmaker. One of the main names of the cinema marginal underground movement, his most known work is The Red Light Bandit (1968). Influenced by Orson Welles, Jean-Luc Godard, and José Mojica Marins, Sganzerla often used clichés from film noir and pornochanchadas. Irony, narrative subversion and collage were trademarks of his film aesthetics.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Rogério Sganzerla" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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