Roger Shattuck  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 06:58, 29 April 2008
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Revision as of 06:59, 29 April 2008
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

Next diff →
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-''[[Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, pataphysician]]'' (French: ''Gestes et opinions du docteur Faustroll, pataphysicien'') is a [[1911]] novel by [[Alfred Jarry]], a retelling of the [[Faust]] story.+'''Roger Shattuck''' ([[1923]]-[[2005]]) was an [[United States|American]] writer best known for his books on [[French literature]], [[French art|art]], and [[French classical music|music]] of the twentieth century. Born in [[New York]] to parents Howard Francis Shattuck, a physician, and Elizabeth (Colt) Shattuck, he attended [[Yale University|Yale]] after graduating from [[St. Paul's School (Concord, New Hampshire)|St. Paul's School]] in [[Concord, New Hampshire]], before serving as a pilot in the Pacific theater during the [[Second World War]]. After the war, he lived in [[Paris]] where he worked for [[UNESCO]]'s film service. In this capacity he came into contact with luminaries of European culture such as [[Jean Cocteau]], [[Alice B. Toklas]] and [[Georges Braque]], and met his future wife Nora White, a dancer with the [[Ballets Russes]].
-Written in [[1898]], but [[unpublished]] until after his death, his fiction describes the exploits and teachings of a sort of [[antiphilosopher]] who, born at age 63, travels through a hallucinatory Paris in a sieve and subscribes to the tenets of ''[['pataphysics]]''. 'Pataphysics deals with "the laws which govern exceptions and will explain the universe supplementary to this one". In 'pataphysics, every event in the universe is accepted as an [[extraordinary]] event.+When he returned to New York, Shattuck worked in publishing, and later taught at [[Harvard University]], the [[University of Texas at Austin]], the [[University of Virginia]], and [[Boston University]], despite his lack of a graduate degree.
-Its current English translation is by [[Simon Watson Taylor]], published by [[Exact Change]], with a foreword by [[Roger Shattuck]].+Shattuck was among the founding members of the [[Association of Literary Scholars and Critics]].
 + 
 +In addition to a long list of distinguished translations from the French, Shattuck's works include:
 + 
 +*''The Banquet Years: The Origins of the Avant-Garde in France, 1885 to World War I'' (1958)
 +*''Proust's Binoculars'' (1963)
 +*''Half Tame'' (1964)
 +*''The Forbidden Experiment: The Story of the Wild Boy of Aveyron'' (1980)
 +*''Forbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography'' (1994)
 +*''Proust's Way: A Field Guide to 'In Search of Lost Time'' (2000)
 + 
 +Shattuck's essays frequently appeared in ''[[The New York Review of Books]]'' and other publications.
-== See also == 
-*[[Bibliothèque du Docteur Faustroll]] 
{{GFDL}} {{GFDL}}

Revision as of 06:59, 29 April 2008

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Roger Shattuck (1923-2005) was an American writer best known for his books on French literature, art, and music of the twentieth century. Born in New York to parents Howard Francis Shattuck, a physician, and Elizabeth (Colt) Shattuck, he attended Yale after graduating from St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, before serving as a pilot in the Pacific theater during the Second World War. After the war, he lived in Paris where he worked for UNESCO's film service. In this capacity he came into contact with luminaries of European culture such as Jean Cocteau, Alice B. Toklas and Georges Braque, and met his future wife Nora White, a dancer with the Ballets Russes.

When he returned to New York, Shattuck worked in publishing, and later taught at Harvard University, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, and Boston University, despite his lack of a graduate degree.

Shattuck was among the founding members of the Association of Literary Scholars and Critics.

In addition to a long list of distinguished translations from the French, Shattuck's works include:

  • The Banquet Years: The Origins of the Avant-Garde in France, 1885 to World War I (1958)
  • Proust's Binoculars (1963)
  • Half Tame (1964)
  • The Forbidden Experiment: The Story of the Wild Boy of Aveyron (1980)
  • Forbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography (1994)
  • Proust's Way: A Field Guide to 'In Search of Lost Time (2000)

Shattuck's essays frequently appeared in The New York Review of Books and other publications.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Roger Shattuck" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools