Social work  

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'''Social work''' is both a profession and social science. It involves the application of [[social theory]] and research methods to study and improve the lives of people, groups, and societies. It incorporates and uses other [[social sciences]] as a means to improve the [[human condition]] and positively change society's response to chronic problems. '''Social work''' is both a profession and social science. It involves the application of [[social theory]] and research methods to study and improve the lives of people, groups, and societies. It incorporates and uses other [[social sciences]] as a means to improve the [[human condition]] and positively change society's response to chronic problems.
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-Social work is a profession committed to the pursuit of [[social justice]], to the enhancement of the [[quality of life]], and to the development of the full potential of each individual, group and community in the society. It seeks to simultaneously address and resolve [[social issues]] at every level of society and economic status, but especially among the poor and sick.  
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-Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. They work with [[individuals]], [[Family|families]], [[Group (sociology)|groups]], [[organizations]] and [[communities]]. 
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-Social work and human history go together. Social work was always in human societies although it began to be a defined pursuit and profession in the 19th century. This definition was in response to societal problems that resulted from the [[Industrial Revolution]] and an increased interest in applying [[scientific theory]] to various aspects of study. Eventually an increasing number of educational institutions began to offer social work programmes.  
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-The [[settlement movement]]'s emphasis on [[advocacy]] and case work became part of social work practice. During the 20th century, the profession began to rely more on research and evidenced-based practice as it attempted to improve its professionalism. Today social workers are employed in a myriad of pursuits and settings.  
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-Professional social workers are generally considered those who hold a [[professional degree]] in social work and often also have a [[license]] or are professionally [[registration|registered]]. Social workers have organized themselves into local, national, and international [[Professional body|professional bodies]] to further the aims of the profession.  
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==History== ==History==
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The practice and profession of modern social work has a relatively recent scientific origin, originating in the [[19th Century]]. The movement began primarily in the [[United States]] and [[England]]. The practice and profession of modern social work has a relatively recent scientific origin, originating in the [[19th Century]]. The movement began primarily in the [[United States]] and [[England]].
-After the end of [[feudalism]], the poor were seen as a more direct threat to the [[social order]],{{Fact|date=April 2008}} and so the state formed an organized system to care for them. The development of the profession was linked closely with [[public health]] and [[psychiatry]], and over the 20th century expanded to include [[Critical theory|radical]] and [[Feminism|feminist]] philosophies.+After the end of [[feudalism]], the poor were seen as a more direct threat to the [[social order]], and so the state formed an organized system to care for them. The development of the profession was linked closely with [[public health]] and [[psychiatry]], and over the 20th century expanded to include [[Critical theory|radical]] and [[Feminism|feminist]] philosophies.

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Social work is both a profession and social science. It involves the application of social theory and research methods to study and improve the lives of people, groups, and societies. It incorporates and uses other social sciences as a means to improve the human condition and positively change society's response to chronic problems.

History

Social work has its roots in the struggle of society to ameliorate poverty and the resultant problems. Therefore, social work is intricately linked with the idea of charity work; but must be understood in broader terms. The concept of charity goes back to ancient times, and the practice of providing for the poor has roots in all major world religions.

The practice and profession of modern social work has a relatively recent scientific origin, originating in the 19th Century. The movement began primarily in the United States and England.

After the end of feudalism, the poor were seen as a more direct threat to the social order, and so the state formed an organized system to care for them. The development of the profession was linked closely with public health and psychiatry, and over the 20th century expanded to include radical and feminist philosophies.


Types of International, Social and Community practice

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Social work" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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