Social work  

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-'''Social work''' is both a profession and social science. It involves the application of [[social theory]] and research methods to study and improve the lives of people, groups, and societies. It incorporates and uses other [[social sciences]] as a means to improve the [[human condition]] and positively change society's response to chronic problems. +'''Social work''' is a professional and academic discipline that seeks to improve the [[quality of life]] and [[subjective well-being]] of individuals, groups, and communities through research, policy, community organizing, direct practice, [[crisis intervention]], and teaching for the benefit of those affected by social disadvantages such as poverty, mental and physical illness or disability, and [[social injustice]], including violations of their [[civil liberties]] and [[human rights]]. Research is often focused on human development, [[psychotherapy]] and [[counselling]], [[social policy]], public administration, social program evaluation, and community development. Social workers typically undergo a systematic set of training and qualifications that are distinct from those of care workers, care assistants or social care workers, who may undertake social work roles but not necessarily have the qualifications of a professional social worker. Social workers are organized into local, national, continental, and international [[professional bodies]]. It is an interdisciplinary field that incorporates theoretical bases from [[economics]], [[education]], [[sociology]], [[law]], [[medicine]], [[philosophy]], [[politics]], [[anthropology]], and [[psychology]].
==History== ==History==

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Social work is a professional and academic discipline that seeks to improve the quality of life and subjective well-being of individuals, groups, and communities through research, policy, community organizing, direct practice, crisis intervention, and teaching for the benefit of those affected by social disadvantages such as poverty, mental and physical illness or disability, and social injustice, including violations of their civil liberties and human rights. Research is often focused on human development, psychotherapy and counselling, social policy, public administration, social program evaluation, and community development. Social workers typically undergo a systematic set of training and qualifications that are distinct from those of care workers, care assistants or social care workers, who may undertake social work roles but not necessarily have the qualifications of a professional social worker. Social workers are organized into local, national, continental, and international professional bodies. It is an interdisciplinary field that incorporates theoretical bases from economics, education, sociology, law, medicine, philosophy, politics, anthropology, and psychology.

History

Social work has its roots in the struggle of society to ameliorate poverty and the resultant problems. Therefore, social work is intricately linked with the idea of charity work; but must be understood in broader terms. The concept of charity goes back to ancient times, and the practice of providing for the poor has roots in all major world religions.

The practice and profession of modern social work has a relatively recent scientific origin, originating in the 19th Century. The movement began primarily in the United States and England.

After the end of feudalism, the poor were seen as a more direct threat to the social order, and so the state formed an organized system to care for them. The development of the profession was linked closely with public health and psychiatry, and over the 20th century expanded to include radical and feminist philosophies.


Types of International, Social and Community practice

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Social work" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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