The French Line  

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-:In [[Hollywood]], Bardot was considered too [[risqué]] to handle — erotica like Bardot's ''[[Cette sacrée gamine]]'' (''[[That Crazy Kid]]'', [[1955]]) was not typical of the American cinema of the time, and it was considered acceptable at the box office so long as it was clearly labeled "[[European erotica|European]]." The [[Doris Day]] era was in full swing, and [[Jane Russell]] in ''[[The French Line]]'' (1953) was thought to have been going too far by showing her [[midriff]]. --[[Sholem Stein]]+:"[[Jane Russell]] in ''[[The French Line]]'' (1953) was thought to have been going too far for American audiences and the [[Legion of Decency]] by showing her [[midriff]]." --[[Sholem Stein]]
 +'''''The French Line''''' is a [[1954 in film|1954]] [[musical film]] made by [[RKO]], directed by [[Lloyd Bacon]] and produced by [[Edmund Grainger]], with [[Howard Hughes]] as executive producer. The [[screenplay]] was by [[Mary Loos]] and [[Richard Sale (director)|Richard Sale]], based on a story by [[Matty Kemp]] and [[Isabel Dawn]]. It was filmed in three strip technicolor and Dual strip polarized [[3-D film|3-D]] during what many consider 3-D films "golden era" of 1952-1954.
 + 
 +The film stars [[Jane Russell]] and [[Gilbert Roland]] and features an uncredited [[Kim Novak]] in her first film appearance.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
"Jane Russell in The French Line (1953) was thought to have been going too far for American audiences and the Legion of Decency by showing her midriff." --Sholem Stein

The French Line is a 1954 musical film made by RKO, directed by Lloyd Bacon and produced by Edmund Grainger, with Howard Hughes as executive producer. The screenplay was by Mary Loos and Richard Sale, based on a story by Matty Kemp and Isabel Dawn. It was filmed in three strip technicolor and Dual strip polarized 3-D during what many consider 3-D films "golden era" of 1952-1954.

The film stars Jane Russell and Gilbert Roland and features an uncredited Kim Novak in her first film appearance.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The French Line" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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