Verse–chorus form  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Verse-chorus form is a musical form common in popular music and predominant in rock since the 1960s. In contrast to AABA (thirty-two-bar) form, which is focused on the verse (contrasted and prepared by the bridge), in verse-chorus form the chorus is highlighted (prepared and contrasted with the verse).

The chorus often sharply contrasts the verse melodically, rhythmically, and harmonically, and assumes a higher level of dynamics and activity, often with added instrumentation. See: arrangement.

Contrasting verse-chorus form

Songs which use different music for the verse and chorus are in contrasting verse-chorus form. Examples include:

Simple verse-chorus form

Songs that use the same music for the verse and chorus, such as the twelve bar blues, though the lyrics feature different verses and a repeated chorus, are in simple verse-chorus form. Examples include:

Simple verse form

Songs which feature only a repeated verse are in simple verse form (verse-chorus form without the chorus). Examples include:

and with a contrasting bridge:

Both simple verse-chorus form and simple verse form are strophic forms.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Verse–chorus form" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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