A Party of Charlatans in an Italian Landscape  

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A Party of Charlatans in an Italian Landscape (1657) by Karel Dujardin
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A Party of Charlatans in an Italian Landscape (1657) by Karel Dujardin

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A Party of Charlatans in an Italian Landscape[1] (1657) is a painting by Karel Dujardin in the Louvre.

"Karel Dujardin is best known by his pictures of quacks, so admirably engraved by Boissieu[2]. That in the Louvre, which we reproduce, is the most celebrated. On a bright and soft morning, a charlatan has erected a stand in a village. Elevated on a scaffold, in the costume of Il signor Scaramuccia, he is standing on tiptoe and making antics to half-a-dozen rustics. A man with a black mask accompanies him on a guitar, while a monkey chatters and makes faces. A great sign-board explains what is to be shown in the stable, which serves as a theatre, and open before the quack is his box of elixirs, aleuni barattoli di unguenti but without waiting for the speech of Scaramouch, Punchinello pokes his nose through the curtain. The ruin in the distance, the cloak worn by one of the peasants, the warm light which animates the whole, give a locality to the scene, and remind us of Karel's Roman studies. This picture is full of what we call humour, and would do no discredit to Wilkie." --The Works of Eminent Masters in Painting, Sculpture, Architecture and Decorative Art (1854)

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