A Study of Thomas Hardy  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"A Study of Thomas Hardy" (1914) is an essay by D. H. Lawrence, an admirer of Thomas Hardy. Lawrence was puzzled by the character of Sue Bridehead from Jude the Obscure, and attempted to analyze her sexual problem in this essay.

Incipit:

“Man has made such a mighty struggle to feel at home on the face of the earth, without even yet succeeding.”

From the publisher:

D. H. Lawrence's 'Study of Thomas Hardy', written in the early months of World War I, was originally intended to be a short critical work on Hardy's characters, but developed into a major statement of Lawrence's philosophy of art. The introduction to this work shows its relation to Lawrence's final rewriting of The Rainbow and its place among his continual attempts to express his philosophy in a definitive form. Previously published posthumously from a corrupt typescript, the 'Study' is now more firmly based on Koteliansky's typescript - Lawrence having destroyed the manuscript. The other essays in this volume span virtually the whole of Lawrence's writing career, from 'Art and the Individual' (1908) to his last essay 'John Galsworthy', written in 1927. The introduction sets these essays in the context of Lawrence's life and work. The textual apparatus gives variant readings, and explanatory notes identify references and quotations, and offer background information.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "A Study of Thomas Hardy" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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