African art's influence on Western art  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

At the start of the twentieth century, artists like Picasso, Matisse, Vincent Van Gogh and Modigliani became aware of, and inspired by, African art. In a situation where the established avant-garde was straining against the constraints imposed by serving the world of appearances, African Art demonstrated the power of supremely well organised forms; produced not only by responding to the faculty of sight, but also and often primarily, the faculty of imagination, emotion and mystical and religious experience.

Picasso's African Period

Picasso's African Period

Picasso's African Period, which lasted from 1907 to 1909, was the period when Pablo Picasso painted in a style which was strongly influenced by African sculpture. Picasso discovered African art via Matisse and subsequently visited the Trocadero Museum of Ethnology (now the Musée de l'Homme) with another artist friend, André Derain.

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