Alfredo de la Fé  

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Alfredo De La Fé is a Cuban-born and New York-based violinist that lived in Colombia for more than 16 years, responsible for transforming the violin into an important sound of Salsa and Latin music. The first solo violinist to perform with a Salsa orchestra, De La Fe has toured the world more than thirty times, appearing in concert and participating in more than one hundred albums by such top-ranked Latin artists as Eddie Palmieri, Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Jose Alberto "El Canario", Cheo Feliciano, The Fania All Stars and Santana. His second solo album, Alfredo, released in 1979, received a Grammy nomination as "Best Latin album".

A child prodigy, Alfredo's father who was a singer (a tenor of Opera) in Havana Cuba and sang on Cuban radio with Bienvenido Leon and Celia Cruz in the 1940's recognized his son's skills and encouraged his musical talent. De La Fé began studying violin at the Amadeo Roldan Conservatory in Havana in 1962. Two years later, he received a scholarship to attend the Warsaw Conservatory in Poland. In 1965, he performed compositions by Mendelsson and Tchaikovsky with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra in Carnegie Hall. A scholarship to Juilliard Arts enabled him to further his studies. De La Fé launched his professional career, at the age of twelve, when he switched from classical music to Salsa and accepted an invitation to join charanga legend Jose Fajardo's Orchestra. In 1972, he joined Eddie Palmieri's Orchestra. He remained with the group for a very short period, moving temporarily to San Francisco where he joined Santana. Returning to New York, De La Fé joined Tipica '73 in 1977. Two years later, he released his debut solo album, Alfredo.

In 1980, De La Fé signed with Sars All Stars, and produced thirty two albums for the Latin record label. His second solo album, Charanga '80, was released the same year. In 1981, De La Fé became musical director of Tito Puente's Latin Percussion Jazz Ensemble. The following year, he resumed his solo career, signing with Taboga, for whom he recorded the album, Triunfo. Relocating to Colombia in 1983, De La Fé signed with Phillips and released three albums - Made In Colombia, Dancing In The Tropics and Alfredo De La Fé Vallenato - by the end of the 1980s. In 1989, De La Fé switched to the Fuentes label. Although he joined the Fania All Stars in 1995, De La Fé continued to pursue a solo career. He signed with Sony Music in 1997. Two years later, he toured with his own band, appearing at festivals in Denmark, Holland, France, Turkey and Belgium, and reunited with Eddie Palmieri's Orchestra for a European tour.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Alfredo de la Fé" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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