Andreas Vollenweider  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Andreas Vollenweider (born 4 October 1953) is a Swiss harpist. He is generally categorised as a new-age musician and uses a modified electroacoustic harp of his own design. He has collaborated with Bobby McFerrin, Carly Simon, Luciano Pavarotti and in 1987 received a Grammy Award for the album Down to the Moon. He has toured internationally and produced fourteen regular albums in a career that spans four decades.

Contents

Style

His style has been described as weaving "elements of European classical and folk music, Third World vocal and percussive effects and natural sound effects into cyclical suites". Vollenweider is perceived as one of the purveyors of the New Age genre, although his earlier recordings appeared on the jazz Billboard chart. The composer found that "what I am doing is really a very old thing, a very 'old age' thing, because I'm doing what people have been doing for thousands of years'.

Discography

Albums

Compilations

  • The Trilogy (compilation of Behind the Gardens, Caverna Magica, White Winds, and "Pace Verde," with selections from Eine Art Suite, 1990)
  • Andreas Vollenweider & Friends – Live 1982–1994 (1994)
  • The Essential Andreas Vollenweider (compilation, 2005)
  • The Storyteller (compilation, 2005)
  • Magic Harp (compilation, CD + DVD, 2005)
  • The Magical Journeys of Andreas Vollenweider (soundtrack for the DVD The Magical Journeys of Andreas Vollenweider, 2006)
  • Andreas Vollenweider & Friends 25 Years Live 1982-2007 (2009)

Singles

  • "Pace Verde" (single for Greenpeace, 1983)
  • "The Woman and the Stone" (1984)
  • "Night Fire Dance" (1986)
  • "Dancing with the Lion" (1989), # 25 Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary charts, dated 8/26/1989




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Andreas Vollenweider" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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