Applied arts  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Applied art is the application of design and aesthetics to objects of function and everyday use. Whereas fine arts serve as intellectual stimulation to the viewer or academic sensibilities as well as produced or intended primarily for beauty; the applied arts incorporate design and creative ideals to objects of utility, such as a cup, magazine or decorative park bench. There is considerable overlap between the field and that of the decorative arts; to some extent they are alternative terms.

The fields of industrial design, graphic design, fashion design, interior design, decorative art and functional art are altogether considered applied arts. In a creative and/or abstract context, the fields of architecture and photography are considered applied arts. Many applied art objects are collected, for instance ceramics, textiles, jewelry, glass, furniture, children's toys, cars, electric guitars, as well as various forms of images produced in commercial contexts, such as film posters or old advertisements.

Movements

Museums of applied arts

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Applied arts" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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