Arndt & Partner  

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Arndt & Partner is a contemporary art gallery based in Berlin, Germany, that today is among the city's most important exhibition sites. It is currently located in Mitte near the former Checkpoint Charlie site. The gallery represents a programme of international artists including Douglas Kolk, Thomas Hirschhorn, Sophie Calle and Muntean and Rosenblum.

Works by the gallery artists have been shown in many important exhibitions and institutions, such as the Venice Biennale (1993, 1995, 1999, 2007) the Biennale of Sydney (1992) the São Paulo Art Biennial (1996, 1998, 2004, 2006), documenta (1992, 2007), Whitney Biennial (2000, 2004), Berlin Biennale (2001), Moscow Biennale (2007), the Shanghai Biennale (2006), Museum of Modern Art New York (2006), Tate Modern (2003), Tate Britain (2004), Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin (2006) and the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art (2004/5).

Parallel to the solo presentation of emerging and established artistic positions, thematic group exhibitions also shape the profile of the gallery. In addition to the website and regular catalogue publications, the gallery also publishes a quarterly magazine entitled "Checkpoint".

History

Facing the challenge of a continuously redefining art scene, Arndt & Partner emphasised a programme free of trends or (formal) standards from the beginning. Opening a new space in the "Hackesche Höfe" in Mitte in 1994, Arndt and Partner was amongst the first galleries to establish itself in the new centre of Berlin.

The discovery of emerging Berlin artists and the formation of an international programme of artistic positions which had often not yet been exhibited in Berlin nor in Germany beforehand, have since then become the cornerstones of the gallery profile. In 1997, Arndt & Partner moved to Auguststrasse so as to contribute to the newly emerging gallery centre. There Arndt & Partner developed into an internationally operating art business, which meanwhile belongs to the leading galleries of contemporary art and celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2004.

In September 2001, Arndt & Partner moved to a 380 sqm exhibition and office space on Zimmerstrasse, close to the former Checkpoint Charlie.

Present

In 2006, Arndt & Partner decided to expand and opened an additional space right above the main Gallery 1st Floor. The 400 sqm Gallery 2nd Floor allows for large-scale, complex and museum-like installations and along with this spatial expansion, the gallery's artistic programme was redefined and condensed. Projects by video-artists from the gallery programme are regularly shown in the film lounge and a private viewing Room.

Participating at important international art fairs, such as Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, The Armory Show, New York and Frieze Art Fair in London, Arndt & Partner has developed an international network operating from Berlin which is further broadened by its branch in Zürich,. In September 2008, the gallery opened a new Template:Convert exhibition space close to the Hamburger Bahnhof.

Artists of the gallery

Adam Adach
Sue de Beer
Veronica Brovall
Erik Bulatov
Sophie Calle
Joe Coleman
William Cordova
Wei Dong
Wang Du
Yannick Demmerle
Gabi Hamm
Mathilde ter Heijne
Anton Henning
Thomas Hirschhorn
Jon Kessler
Henning Kles
Douglas Kolk
Karsten Konrad
Josephine Meckseper
Muntean and Rosenblum
Erik Parker
Julian Rosefeldt
Charles Sandison
Dennis Scholl
Nedko Solakov
Hiroshi Sugito
Tim Trantenroth
Susan Turcot
Keith Tyson
Veron Urdarianu
Shi Xinning





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Arndt & Partner" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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