Art world  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

An art world is comprised of all the people involved in the production, commission, preservation, promotion, criticism, and sale of art. In Europe and the Western Hemisphere, most purveyors of contemporary art - artists, art galleries, art educators, critics and museum personnel - refer to the market and social forces that bind them as the "Art World".

The art world is also the spiritual home of most subcultures.

Origins of the term

The term " Artworld" is a product of the Institutional theory of art. It originates with the theories of Arthur Danto an American art critic and philosopher. Danto in 1964 wrote the essay "The Artworld" in which the term “artworld” was coined, meaning cultural context or “an atmosphere of art theory,”. It has had considerable influence on aesthetic philosophy and, according to professor of philosophy Stephen David Ross, "especially upon George Dickie's institutional theory of art. Dickie defines an art work as an artifact 'which has had conferred upon it the status of candidate for appreciation by some person or persons acting in behalf of a certain social institution (the artworld)' (p. 43.)"

The central core of Danto’s The Artworld is ‘artistic theory’, which elevates things to the world of art(or Art World).

"“these days one might not be aware he was on artistic terrain without an artistic theory to tell him so. And part of the reason for this lies in the fact that terrain is constituted artistic in virtue of artistic theories, so that one use of theories, in addition to helping us discriminate art from the rest, consists in making art possible.” (Danto, The Artworld. 1964 P.3)


In music

Simon Frith (1996) describes three art worlds present in the music industry: the art music world, the folk music world, and the commercial music world. Timothy Taylor (2004) associates these worlds with three popular music genres: rock and roll, hip-hop music, and pop music, respectively.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Art world" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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