Artsploitation  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Artsploitation (portmanteau of art and exploitation) of is a relatively new neologism, possibly coined by Steve Erickson in his review of Park Chan-wook's Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance for Gay City News. He cites Takashi Miike's Audition and Catherine Breillat's Fat Girl as examples and notes, "Such artsploitation films combine extremes of sex and violence with stylistic choices, slow pacing, and an openness to wide tonal shifts alien to ordinary genre films. Needless to say, this development hasn’t been greeted with cheers everywhere. Nor have any artsploitation films become major U.S. hits.[1]

In the United States, since the mid 1990s, the names Quentin Tarantino and Matthew Bright (Freeway (1996)) are associated with the term artsploitation.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Artsploitation" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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