Baroque art  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The intensity and immediacy of baroque art and its individualism and detail—observed in such things as the convincing rendering of cloth and skin textures—make it one of the most compelling periods of Western art.

The later Baroque style gradually gave way to a more decorative Rococo, which, through contrast, further defines Baroque.

Painting

Baroque painting

A defining statement of what Baroque signifies in painting is provided by the Marie de' Medici cycle, a series of paintings executed by Peter Paul Rubens for Marie de Medici at the Luxembourg Palace in Paris (now at the Louvre), in which a Catholic painter satisfied a Catholic patron: Baroque-era conceptions of monarchy, iconography, handling of paint, and compositions as well as the depiction of space and movement.

There were highly diverse strands of Italian baroque painting, from Caravaggio to Cortona; both approaching emotive dynamism with different styles.

Sculpture

Baroque sculpture

Another frequently cited work of Baroque art is Bernini's Ecstasy of Saint Teresa for the Cornaro chapel in Saint Maria della Vittoria, which brings together architecture, sculpture, and theater into one grand conceit.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Baroque art" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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