Beau Brummell  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

George Bryan "Beau" Brummell (7 June 1778 – 30 March 1840) was an iconic figure in Regency England, the arbiter of men's fashion, and a friend of the Prince Regent, the future King George IV. He established the mode of dress for men that rejected overly ornate fashions for one of understated, but perfectly fitted and tailored bespoke garments. This look was based on dark coats, full-length trousers rather than knee breeches and stockings, and above all immaculate shirt linen and an elaborately knotted cravat.

Beau Brummell is credited with introducing, and establishing as fashion, the modern men's suit, worn with a necktie. He claimed he took five hours a day to dress, and recommended that boots be polished with champagne. His style of dress is often referred to as dandyism.

Further reading

  • Jesse, Captain William. The Life of Beau Brummell. Published in two volumes
  • Barbey d'Aurevilly, Jules. Of Dandyism and of George Brummell, 1845
  • Wharton, Grace and Philip. Wits and Beaux of Society. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1861
  • Lewis, Melville. Beau Brummell: His Life and Letters. New York: Doran, 1925
  • Campbell, Kathleen. Beau Brummell. London: Hammond, 1948
  • Moers, Ellen. The Dandy: Brummell to Beerbohm. London: Secker and Warburg, 1960
  • Nicolay, Claire. Origins and Reception of Regency Dandyism: Brummell to Baudelaire. Ph.D. diss., Loyola U of Chicago, 1998
  • Kelly, Ian. Beau Brummell: The Ultimate Dandy. Hodder & Stoughton, 2005




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Beau Brummell" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools