Blason and contreblason du couillon  

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Friar John and  Panurge give the Blason and contreblason du couillon  by  Rabelais
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Friar John and Panurge give the Blason and contreblason du couillon by Rabelais

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The blason and contreblason du couillon (Eng blason and counterblason of the bollock) are two blasons of the couillons (English: bollocks) which are featured in Rabelais's Third Book of Gargantua and Pantagruel. First, there is Panurge's blason[1] in "How Panurge consulteth with Friar John of the Funnels", then Frère Jean's counterblason[2] in "How Friar John comforteth Panurge in the doubtful matter of cuckoldry".

The number of epithets seems to vary from translation to translation. Bakhtin in Rabelais and His World only counts 153 for the praise (blason) and 150 for the abuse (counterblason).

Most sources speak of 166 for the blason and 168 for the counterblason:

La liste de Panurge continue jusqu'au cent soixante-sixième couillon. Tandis que les adjectifs de Panurge sont plutôt positifs, Frère Jean répond par cent soixante-huit couillons plutôt négatifs.[3]

Madness, Masks, and Laughter: An Essay on Comedy (1995) by Rupert D. V. Glasgow speaks of 166 for the blason and 169 for the counterblason.

The English version by [4] Urquhart and Motteux features 275 epithets for the blason and 432 for the counterblason.

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