Brute fact  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Brute facts are facts which are facts in and of themselves, while institutional facts are, arguably, conventional. Institutional facts require the support of an institution. The term was coined by G. E. M. Anscombe and popularized by John Searle.

For instance, the fact that a certain piece of paper is money is an institutional fact, because that property is dependent on the institution that created and controls that money and that piece of paper will only be money as long as the members of that society believe that it is so. However, it is a brute fact that a certain piece of paper is a piece of paper.

While brute facts are true in and of themselves, institutional facts are, arguably, conventional.

The more common but less technical definition of brute fact is "a terminus of a series of explanations which is not itself further explicable".

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Brute fact" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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