C. P. Snow  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Charles Percy Snow CBE (15 October 1905 – 1 July 1980), who was raised to the peerage as Baron Snow, of the City of Leicester, was an English chemist and novelist who also served in several important positions in the British Civil Service and briefly in the UK government. He is best known for his series of novels known collectively as "Strangers and Brothers", and for "The Two Cultures", a 1959 lecture in which he laments the gulf between scientists and "literary intellectuals".

Works

Fiction

Strangers and Brothers series
Other fiction
  • Death Under Sail, 1932
  • New Lives for Old, 1933
  • The Search, 1934
  • The Malcontents, 1972
  • In Their Wisdom, 1974, shortlisted for the Booker Prize
  • A Coat of Varnish, 1979

Non-fiction

  • The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, 1959
  • Science and Government, 1961
  • The Two Cultures and a Second Look, 1963
  • Variety of men, 1967
  • The State of Siege, 1968
  • Public Affairs, 1971
  • Trollope: His Life and Art, 1975
  • The Realists, 1978
  • The Physicists, 1981




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "C. P. Snow" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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