Canon (fiction)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
This article is not about literary canons of influential works of fiction, but about the concept of a canon which defines the world of a particular fictional series or franchise.

Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc., that are considered to be genuine or officially sanctioned, and those events, characters, settings, etc., that are considered to have existence within the fictional universe. In order for a setting to appear cohesive, especially in fictions that contain multiple parts, both creators and audiences sometimes find it useful to define what has and has not "actually happened" in that universe.

Material that is considered canon usually comes from the original source or author of the fictional universe, while spin-offs and adaptations to other media are more likely to be non-canon and fan fiction is almost always non-canon.

See also

Examples




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Canon (fiction)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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