Carlton Cabinet  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The" Carlton Cabinet is a bookcase and room divider designed by Ettore Sottsass, first produced in 1981 during the Memphis design movement. The furniture piece inspired Simon Martin's nine minute film Carlton (2006).

Carlton is a nine-minute conversation piece about an iconic bookcase, which stands in an empty gallery space. The Carlton bookcase was created in the 1980s by Memphis, the Milanese design group founded by Ettore Sottsass, a grandee of Italian design. With brightly-coloured, print laminate shelves branching out at comical angles, it reads more like a postmodern sculpture than a piece of functional furniture and it is typical of the group’s humorous ‘New Internationalist Style’ which was a reaction against ‘black boxBauhaus functionalism."--[1]




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Carlton Cabinet" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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