Charcot's triad  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Charcot's triad refers to two separate sets of three signs each discovered by Jean-Martin Charcot. Each set of three relates includes its own three signs, and each of them relate to separate diseases. One pertains to multiple sclerosis while the other refers to ascending cholangitis. Charcot's triads are named for Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–1893), the French neurologist who first described the combinations of signs in relation to these diseases.

Types

One set of three signs, making up one of the two different Charcot's triads, is an indication of cholangitis and includes RUQ pain, jaundice and fever. A related finding is Reynolds' pentad. The name "Cholangitis" falsely suggests that it is an infection of the bile duct; in fact, it refers to an infection of the biliary tree. The most common causative organism is E. coli.

The other set of three signs, making up the other of the two different Charcot's triads, relates to multiple sclerosis and includes intention tremor, dysarthria, and nystagmus.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Charcot's triad" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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