Comic novel  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Menippean satire, Baroque comic fiction

A comic novel is a work of fiction in which the writer seeks to amuse the reader: sometimes with subtlety and as part of a carefully woven narrative, sometimes above all other considerations.

One of the most notable British comic novelists is P.G. Wodehouse, whose work follows on from that of Jerome Klapka Jerome and Weedon and Grossmith's Diary of A Nobody. Nor can Saki's work be ignored, although his career was cut short by the tragic waste of the Great War. AG MacDonnell and GK Chesterton also produced flights of whimsy that delighted their reading audiences in their day. Other, more contemporary UK authors of this ilk include Tom Sharpe, Martin Amis, Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams, Evelyn Waugh and Ben Elton.

Notable American comic novelists include Hunter S. Thompson, John Kennedy Toole, Robert Clark Young, Carl Hiaasen, Joseph Heller and Terry Southern.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Comic novel" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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