Corporation  

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"Through vignettes and interviews, the documentary film The Corporation (2003) examines and criticizes corporate business ethics and compares the profile of the contemporary profitable business corporation to that of a clinically diagnosed psychopath. It claims that corporations are systematically compelled to behave with what it claims are the DSM-IV 's symptoms of psychopathy, e.g., the callous disregard for the feelings of other people, the incapacity to maintain human relationships, the reckless disregard for the safety of others, the deceitfulness, the incapacity to experience guilt, and the failure to conform to social norms and respect the law."--Sholem Stein

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

A corporation is a legal personality, usually used to conduct business. Corporations exist as a product of corporate law, and their rules balance the interests of the shareholders that invest their capital and the employees who contribute their labour. People work together in corporations to produce. In modern times, corporations have become an increasingly dominant part of economic life. People rely on corporations for employment, for their goods and services, for the value of the pensions, for economic growth and social development.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Corporation" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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