Corruption  

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The Index Librorum Prohibitorum ("List of Prohibited Books") is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and the faith of its members. The various editions also contain the rules of the Church relating to the reading, selling and censorship of books. The aim of the list was to prevent the reading of immoral books or works containing theological errors and to prevent the corruption of the faithful.
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The Index Librorum Prohibitorum ("List of Prohibited Books") is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and the faith of its members. The various editions also contain the rules of the Church relating to the reading, selling and censorship of books. The aim of the list was to prevent the reading of immoral books or works containing theological errors and to prevent the corruption of the faithful.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
deprave and corrupt

In philosophical, theological, or moral discussions, corruption is spiritual or moral impurity or deviation from an ideal. Corruption entails many forms including bribery and embezzlement. Government corruption occurs when an elected representative makes decisions that are influenced by vested interest rather than their own personal or party ideological beliefs.

This article deals with the commonplace use of the term corruption to mean dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power.

Contents

Etymology

The word corrupt (Middle English, from Latin corruptus, past participle of corrumpere, to destroy : com-, intensive pref. and rumpere, to break) when used as an adjective literally means "utterly broken". In modern English usage the words corruption and corrupt have many meanings:

Contexts

  • Political corruption, the abuse of public power, office, or resources by government officials or employees for personal gain, e.g. by extortion, soliciting or offering bribes
  • Police corruption, a specific form of police misconduct designed to obtain financial benefits, other personal gain, and/or career advancement for a police officer or officers in exchange for not pursuing, or selectively pursuing, an investigation or arrest
  • Corporate corruption, corporate criminality and the abuse of power by corporation officials, either internally or externally, including the fact that police obstruct justice.
  • Corruption (philosophical concept), often refers to spiritual or moral impurity, or deviation from an ideal
  • Corruption Perceptions Index, published yearly by Transparency International
  • Putrefaction, the natural process of decomposition in the human and animal body following death
  • Data corruption, an unintended change to data in storage or in transit
  • Linguistic corruption, the change in meaning to a language or a text introduced by cumulative errors in transcription as changes in the language speakers' comprehension
  • Bribery in politics, business, or sport
  • Rule of law, governmental corruption of judiciary, includes governmental spending on the courts, which is completely financially controlled by the executive in many transitional and developing countries


Entertainment with corruption themes

See also

  • Collusion, an agreement between two or more persons, sometimes illegal and therefore secretive, to limit open competition by deceiving, misleading, or defrauding others of their legal rights, or to obtain an objective forbidden by law typically by defrauding or gaining an unfair advantage
  • Civil society, composed of the totality of voluntary civic and social organizations and institutions that form the basis of a functioning society, as distinct from the force-backed structures of a state (regardless of that state's political system) and commercial institutions of the market




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Corruption" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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