Curtis Harrington  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Curtis Harrington (September 17, 1926May 6, 2007) was an American film and television director whose work included experimental films, horror films, and episodic television.

Harrington was born in Los Angeles and attended Occidental College and the University of Southern California and graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles, with a film studies degree.

He began his career as a film critic, writing a book on Josef von Sternberg in 1948. He directed several avant-garde short films in the 1940s, including Fragment of Seeking and Picnic. Harrington worked with Kenneth Anger, serving as a cinematographer on Anger's Puce Moment and acting in Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome.

Harrington had cameo roles in films such as Orson Welles's The Other Side of the Wind and Bill Condon's Gods and Monsters. (Harrington knew James Whale during the end of Whale's life, and was a major contributor to Condon's film.) He also directed Who Slew Auntie Roo? (1971) with Shelley Winters, What's the Matter With Helen? with Winters and Debbie Reynolds (1972), and The Killer Bees (1974) with Gloria Swanson in one of her last film roles.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Harrington directed episodes of Dynasty, Wonder Woman, The Twilight Zone, and Charlie's Angels for television.

Legacy

He is considered one of the forerunners of New Queer Cinema.

Selected filmography as director




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Curtis Harrington" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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