The Devil Came from Akasava  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Devil Came from Akasava (German: Der Teufel kam aus Akasava) is a 1971 West German-Spanish adventure-spy film directed by Jesús Franco. It was based on a novel by Edgar Wallace called Keeper of the Stone.

Contents

Background

The Devil Came from Akasava is based on the short story Keepers of the Stone in the collection Sanders of the River by Edgar Wallace and forming a part of exotic stories on the fictional indigenous people of the Akasava. It is a late example of Edgar Wallace film adaptations that were particularly popular in Germany during the 1960s.

The lead actress Soledad Miranda was killed in a car accident in Portugal soon after finishing this film.

Plot

Prof. Walter Forrester (Ángel Menéndez) is a British scientist working in the Akasava jungle in South America. His assistant finds a mysterious stone but it is stolen and Forrester vanishes, leaving him as the sole suspect. However, after a Scotland Yard detective is murdered while entering Forrester's office in London, the Scotland Yard chief Sir Philipp (Siegfried Schürenberg) hands the case to Jane Morgan (Soledad Miranda), an attractive agent, while given its international priority, Secret Intelligence Service will be on the case. Now, on a secret mission and with double identity as the young stripper wife of the British consul Irving Lambert (Alberto Dalbés), Morgan arrives in South America. Meanwhile, she meets Rex Forrester (Fred Williams), professor's nephew who is also concerned of his fate and arrives in the country for further investigation.

Cast


See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Devil Came from Akasava" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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