Dio Chrysostom  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Dio Chrysostom (Δίων Χρυσόστομος ), Dion of Prusa or Dio Cocceianus (ca. 40 – ca. 115) was a Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Roman Empire in the 1st century. Eighty of his Discourses (or Orations) are extant, as well as a few Letters and a funny mock essay In Praise of Hair, as well as a few other fragments. His surname Chrysostom comes from the Greek chrysostomos, which literally means "golden-mouthed". He should not be confused with the Roman historian Cassius Dio, nor with the 4th-century bishop John Chrysostom of Constantinople.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Dio Chrysostom" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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