Dramatic programming  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Dramatic programming is television content that is scripted and (normally) fictional. This excludes, for example, sports, news, reality and game shows, stand-up comedy and variety shows. Also, by convention, the term is not generally usually used for situation comedy or soap opera.

Most dramatic programming for TV falls within other standard categories such as miniseries, made-for-TV movies or certain rather circumscribed dramatic genres. One major category of dramatic programing, particularly in the United States, is Crime Drama.

Some examples of BBC dramatic programming would be the serials The Six Wives of Henry VIII or Our Friends in the North.

In the US, terms such as television drama and television drama series are common for dramatic programming.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Dramatic programming" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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