Edgar Allan Poe  

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In 1963, Roger Corman directed The Raven, a horror-comedy written by Richard Matheson very loosely based on the poem, "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe. It stars Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, and Boris Karloff as a trio of rival sorcerers.
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In 1963, Roger Corman directed The Raven, a horror-comedy written by Richard Matheson very loosely based on the poem, "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe. It stars Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, and Boris Karloff as a trio of rival sorcerers.
"The mind of man can imagine nothing which has not really existed [...]." --Edgar Allan Poe

"Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence -- whether much that is glorious- whether all that is profound -- does not spring from disease of thought -- from moods of mind exalted at the expense of the general intellect." --"Eleonora"

A daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe
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A daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809October 7, 1849) was an American writer, and one of the leaders of the American Romanticism. Best known for his tales of the macabre and mystery, Poe was one of the early American practitioners of the short story and a progenitor of detective fiction and crime fiction. During his lifetime he was more popular in France (thanks to the translations of Baudelaire) than in his native country. After his premature death at the age of 40 he became internationally renowned. The Japanese writer Edogawa Rampo derived his pseudonym of his name. He came to the attention of 20th century audiences via the low-budget film adaptations by Roger Corman starring Vincent Price.

Contents

Bibliography

Works on Poe

Selected list of works

Tales

Poetry

Other Works

Collections

Please note that this list of collections refers only to those printed during Poe's lifetime with his permission. Modern anthologies are not included.

  • Tamerlane and Other Poems (credited by "a Bostonian") (1827)
  • Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane and Minor Poems (1829)
  • Poems (1831, printed as "second edition")
  • Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (December 1839)
  • The Prose Romances of Edgar A. Poe (1843)
  • Tales (1845, Wiley & Putnam)
  • The Raven and Other Poems (1845, Wiley & Putnam)

Literary influence

Poe's works have had a broad influence on American and world literature (sometimes even despite those who tried to resist it), and even on the art world beyond literature. The scope of Poe's influence on art is evident when one sees the many and diverse artists who were directly and profoundly influenced by him.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Edgar Allan Poe" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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