Eric Dolphy  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Eric Allan Dolphy (June 20, 1928June 29, 1964) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, flautist, and bass clarinetist.

Dolphy was one of several groundbreaking jazz alto players to rise to prominence in the 1960s. He was also the first important bass clarinet soloist in jazz, and among the earliest significant flute soloists.

His improvisational style was characterized by the use of wide intervals based largely on the twelve tone scale, in addition to using an array of human-like and animal-like effects which almost literally made his instruments speak. Although Dolphy's work is sometimes classified as free jazz, his compositions and solos had a logic uncharacteristic of many other free jazz musicians of the day; even as such, he was definitively avant-garde. In the years after his death, his music was more aptly described as being "too out to be in and too in to be out."

Dolphy posthumously became an inductee of the Down Beat Jazz Hall of Fame in 1964.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Eric Dolphy" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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