Ernst Stadler  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Ernst Stadler (11 August 1883 — 30 October 1914) was a German Expressionist poet. He was born in Colmar, Alsace-Lorraine and educated in Strasbourg and Oxford; in 1906 he was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Magdalen College, Oxford.

His early verse was influenced by Stefan George, but after 1911, Stadler began developing a different style, and his most important volume of poetry, Der Aufbruch, which appeared during 1914, is regarded as a major work of early Expressionism. The poems of Der Aufbruch are a celebration of the poet's joy in life and are written in long, free verse lines inspired by the example of Walt Whitman.

Stadler was killed in battle at Zandvoorde near Ypres in the early months of World War I.

Sources

  • Ernst Stadler Der Aufbruch (ed. Heinze Rölleke, Reclam, 1967)
  • Gedichte des Expressionismus (ed. Dietrich Bode, Reclam, 1966)




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Ernst Stadler" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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