Every  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
  1. All of a countable group, without exception.
    Every person in the room stood and cheered.
  2. Used with ordinal numbers to denote those items whose position is divisible by the corresponding cardinal number, or a portion of equal size to that set.
    Every third bead was red, and the rest were blue. The sequence was thus red, blue, blue, red, blue, blue etc.
    Decimation originally meant the execution of every tenth soldier in a unit.

Contents

Etymology

From Middle English every, everich, which is made up of Old English ǣfre (“ever”) + ǣlċ (“each”). Furthermore, ǣfre itself comes from ā in fēore ("ever in life"), and ǣlċ from ā ġelīċ ("ever alike"). Thus equivalent to ever +‎ each.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Related terms




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Every" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools