Falsity  

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True and False Griffins from John Ruskin's Modern Painters (Part IV. Of Many Things), first published in 1856.
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True and False Griffins from John Ruskin's Modern Painters (Part IV. Of Many Things), first published in 1856.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

False is the antonym of the adjective true.

Falsity

Falsity (from Latin falsitas) or falsehood is a perversion of truth originating in the deceitfulness of one party, and culminating in the damage of another party. Falsity is also a measure of the quality or extent of the falseness of something, while a falsehood may also mean simply an incorrect (false) statement, independent of any intention to deceive.

In the Frege-Church ontology, "truth" is the denotation of a true proposition, while "falsity" is the denotation of false propositions.

In esthetics, falsity is ugly, and truth is beautiful.

In existentialism, falsity is usually a thing to be avoided, and is not desired.

Examples

  • Counterfeiting money, or attempting to coin genuine legal tender without due authorization;
  • tampering with wills, codicils, or such-like legal instruments;
  • prying into the correspondence of others to their prejudice;
  • using false weights and measures,
  • adulterating merchandise, so as to render saleable what purchasers would otherwise never buy, or so as to derive larger profits from goods otherwise marketable only at lower figures;
  • bribing judges,
  • suborning witnesses;
  • advancing false testimony;
  • manufacturing spurious seals;
  • forging signatures;
  • padding accounts;
  • interpolating the texts of legal enactments; and
  • sharing in the pretended birth of supposititious offspring

are among the chief forms which this crime assumes.


See also

  • Fake
  • Lie or falsehood, a type of deception in the form of an untruthful statement
  • Falsity or falsehood, in law, deceitfulness by one party that results in damage to another
  • Falsies padding for use in a brassiere to create the appearance of larger breasts




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Falsity" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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